architecture, aviary, belvedere, eyecatcher, Folly, garden, landscape, Menagerie, North Yorkshire, Temple, Tower

Culloden Tower, Richmond, North Yorkshire

On Sunday, The Folly Flâneuse was one of the happy few who discovered the location of the Secret Salons, three venues which combined the finest music and architecture. As part of Richmond’s annual festival celebrating all things Georgian, the evening was a fundraiser for the town’s Theatre Royal, a unique intact survivor from that era. Participants promenaded between three lovely venues, but of course the one that gave the greatest joy to the present writer was the Culloden Tower.

architecture, eyecatcher, Folly, landscape, North Yorkshire, Summerhouse, Temple

Temple on Round Howe, Richmond, North Yorkshire

View of the Round Howe near Richmond by George Cut 1788. Courtesy of The Met, New York, accession 65.251.2 Gift of Mrs. William M. Haupt, from the collection of Mrs. James B. Haggin, 1965

Clarkson’s History of Richmond, revised in 1821, recounts that Cuthbert Readshaw created a ‘highly romantic walk’ by the Swale in 1760. Cuthbert Readshaw, who died in 1773 was a merchant who lived in the Bailey (ie the market place) in Richmond, and according to his will he was in ‘the business of wine and spirits and other branches of trade’.

To access the walk 18th century visitors would have travelled downhill from the town centre and crossed the river via the Green Bridge. Promenading along the south bank of the River Swale they would have encountered the picturesque scene of leafy Billy Bank Wood (aka Bordel Bank) and occasional artful outbreaks of the craggy rock face behind. Tucked in the woods was the cleft or cave known as Arthur’s Oven, conjuring romantic images of ancient and wilder times.